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The Plaza del Parque will become the Baron Wolman Square from May 14 to 20 during the Ibizan festival programming thanks to an installation where the images of the first edition of Woodstock or the most mythical covers of the Rolling Stone will be shown. the veteran American photographer.

Baron Wolman received his first camera at age fifteen, fell madly in love with photography and has not stopped shooting the Nikons that have passed through his hands. “The click of the camera is like the kiss of an angel,” he once said. Wolman now has eighty years and a career that confirms him as one of the great documentaries of rock and roll. Especially, from his golden age. Wolman photographed the magic of the first Woodstock festival – in the summer of ’69 -, he was for many years the graphic editor of Rolling Stone magazine and, next spring, he will become the best godfather that Sueños de Libertad could have. The veteran American photographer will travel to Ibiza to be an active part of the week of culture, music and art, which will be lived on the island.

The Park Plaza of the city of Ibiza will be converted during that time in the Baron Wolman Square. There will be installed a gallery that will show the most important of the work of man that froze the essence of Janis Joplin or Jimi Hendrix in the splendor of his flashing and short runs. From Hendrix, he said that it was impossible to take a single bad snapshot. Joplin convinced her to offer him a private concert (and a cappella) in his photography studio as an excuse to make a color session that later served to illustrate one of his first covers that he signed for Rolling Stone.

Precisely, the installation that will be located in the Plaza del Parque will include the most emblematic covers that Wolman photographed during the sixties and seventies, as well as a wide selection of snapshots taken at the Woodstock festival. In the meadows of Bethel, New York, (a town located 90 kilometers from the village that baptized the festival, which ended up hosting the event because the people of Woodstock opposed) almost four hundred thousand people gathered almost fifty years ago to enjoy four days of concerts that changed the direction of contemporary music and, perhaps, also of the way of life of western youth.

Wolman was there. And not just on stage, photographing portents of the guitar as Carlos Santana. During those days of rock and roll, lysergic experimentation, liberation of the mind and celebration of life, the photographer finally realized that it was the grupis (and, also, the grupis) who were really changing the way of living the music. “The dress of the groups influenced the aesthetics of the bands very much. You could even find fans who knew more about music than the musicians themselves, “Wolman has explained on occasion. That was the reason that led him to get off at times onstage and begin to document the purest side of a counterculture that, to use a current term, was becoming viral in American society in the late sixties.

The wisdom of Wolman, a sympathetic and talkative guy who loves to reflect and joke about the different periods that he has had to portray with his Nikon, can be enjoyed in Sueños de Libertad. The presence of the photographer in the festival will in some way twin the event, which aims to recover the essence of an Ibiza that was a creative refuge for many artists decades ago, with San Francisco, a city that has always been synonymous with the island of freedom within the United States. United, the city to which Wolman always returned after portraying in his concerts characters like Mick Jagger, Joan Baez, Frank Zappa, Jim Morrison, Miles Davis, Iggy Pop, Roger Waters or Pete Townshend, the same myths that will remain days in Ibiza inhabiting the images that will be exhibited in the Baron Wolman Square.